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20121101
20121130
Search Results 0 to 7 of about 8 (some duplicates have been removed)
. the launch pad for peace may be in cairo. in the last 24 hours egypt has been mediating high-stakes discussions between israeli and hamas leaders. speaking today egyptian prime minister hish m kandil said -- in gaza, palestinian medical officials report 95 people have been killed in gaza including 23 children. for the second straight day, israel bombed a building housing local and international media. the target of the attack was a commanding member of an islamic jihad group who also had an apartment in the building. meanwhile, hamas continues to send rockets deep into israel. last night, israel's iron dome intercepted two rockets headed for tel aviv. yesterday, israeli prime minister benjamin netanyahu had tough talks on twitter writing we are exacting a heavy price from hamas and the terrorist organizations. the idf is prepared for a significant expansion of its operation. in a press gaggle on route to cambodia this morning, deputy national security adviser ben rhodes says the white house's goal is to have nations with influence in the region speak for deescalation. speakin
-fire, these talks taking place in cairo have told nbc news they are serious, that they are making progress and that this is how the negotiations stand right at this moment. the israelis want a two-part deal, a two-stage deal. the first part would be an immediate hostility, immediate cessation of violence, both sides stop attacking each other. that would be unconditional. then israel would want to move to a second stage where the two sides, israel and the palestinians, would engage in this discussions, negotiations overs the next two weeks to one month talking about potentially ending the siege on gaza, making it easier for palestinians -- >> and clearly we're having difficulty with richard's reporting. surmounts any difficult of technology. richard is reporting on negotiations in cairo -- amman, you're in gaza as well. negotiations would be a immediate cessation of hostilities and a two-stage process within two weeks to a month there would be a broader agreement. we've known from the start that israel wants to do something about changing the reality where these rocket attacks do not contin
in the last couple of years. he has not achieved the breakthroughs that he wanted when he went to cairo in 2009. and while many on his team have abandoned the playing field, mitchell, dennis ross, this is a unique opportunity for him to reinvigorate his middle east leadership and bring a new team in with new ideas and strategies to resurrect the commitments he made in cairo which is essential to u.s. long-term interest. >> the other relationship is the one between the president and prime minister -- mr. netanyahu, who actually praised the president's diplomatic efforts within this. he's got an election coming up. it's been something of a rocky relationship, if you will. how does this -- the president's involvement strengthen his relationship with netanyahu going forward? >> there's been all this criticism of this relationship, the dysfunctionalty over political issues, negotiations. one thing that's quite clear to me in watching the president very carefully, after the election, he didn't need the jewish vote in florida or new york, and yet he stood up to the plate, he had his reels back
. >> we know they are ongoing. israeli radio is saying an envoy was sent to cairo today. that person will meet up with envoys from the palestinian side, as well as representatives from qatar and egypt that will work on negotiating a cease fire. today you had prime minister netanyahu say as long as the rockets are landing in israel there will be no cease fire. his defense minister ehud barak said he expects the possibility of this conflict widening. that's a suggestion there could be some ground invasion in gaza at the very least. as you know, there are troops amassing in in the south of israel preparing for that ground invasion. although so far it seems like talks are ongoing ander in a period of trying to figure out if they can maintain a cease fire so the troops don't have to go in. >> it is a tense time is an under statement there. how long will these talks go underway? do you know? is there an outside that israel has indicated they will allow for them to try to negotiate and bargain before they may do military action? >> well, we did hear from the foreign minister in israel who s
fire in this critical part of the world? she's going to cairo, to egypt because everybody is counting on them. they are indispensable. the president is finishing his trip in the far east and he's kept up his schedule of public events and appearances there but he's been doing some diplomacy personally. "the new york times" reporting that the president spent last night up until 2:30 in the morning making one-on-one direct phone calls with the israeli prime minister and also not the head of hamas, not the palestinian authority, but the president of egypt, which for a generation was our ally in the region, even though it was a creepy and repressive dictatorship. now that country, that crucial nation in this critical part of the world has a whole new face and maybe a whole new character in terms of its international responsibilities. nobody knows if this effort by them to broker a ceasefire is going to work. but it seems almost as important for the region, for the world, for us, frankly, that if a cease fire is going to come from anywhere, it looks like it's going to come from there. joini
of hamas have been in cairo. they've been meeting with officials. they've told them their conditions for a cease fire. here in gaza, the indication is a cease fire may still be off in the horizon. >> we were hearing, at least from israeli television stations here, that 90% of the conditions for the cease fire were there. that's what hamas was saying, at least, visa is-- vis-a-vis thes israeli networks. what are they saying? >> reporter: the way they've been framing the cease fire talks more about what the two sides want. both sides don't want war, at least they claim so. they both want to come out victorious from these two things. in terms of what hamas has been asking for, they've been asking for a guarantee from israel to not resume assassinations in the killing of its senior leaders, as we saw on wednesday. they're also calling on all the sides, including israel and egypt, to lift the blockade and siege on gaza that's crippled life here. for israel, they want to see a guarantee, not only in the short term that palestinian factions will stop firing rockets, but they want a long-ter
Search Results 0 to 7 of about 8 (some duplicates have been removed)